Plantar Fasciitis Explained


The best bet, if the pain has not subsided after a few days of rest, is to visit your doctor for an accurate diagnosis and to determine the severity of the condition. Your doctor should complete an examination of your foot, and will take a case history to help diagnose the condition. Since plantar fasciitis is not always directly diagnosable, a history is often one of the most reliable ways to get an accurate diagnosis. Plantar fasciitis does not show up on an x-ray, and whilst accompanying heel spurs do, these can be difficult to spot even for a trained professional.

If your foot flattens or becomes unstable during critical times in the walking or running cycle, the attachment of the plantar fascia into your heel bone may begin to stretch and pull away from the heel bone. This will result in pain and possibly swelling. The pain is especially noticeable when you push off with your toes while walking. Since this movement stretches the already injured portion of the fascia. Without treatment the pain will usually spread around the heel. The pain is usually centeredat a location just in front of the heel toward the arch. This results in the development of a heel spur.

The treatment of plantar fasciitis may include non-steroidal anti inflammatory such as Ibuprophen, or Naproxen, rest, ice and heat modalities, or orthotic devices for shoes to provide arch support. Your doctor may inject your foot with corticosteroids or prescribe a corticosteroid cream which may provide relief. If you're overweight diet to normalize your weight may be suggested. Exercises to stretch the plantar fascia and strengthen the lower leg muscles may be suggested. Night splints which hold your foot at a 90 degree angle may be suggested to keep the plantar facia lengthened at night allow for greater stretching and decrease morning pain.

Pain can sometimes cause a lot more than just discomfort. It can often significantly impact daily activities since any weight placed on the affected area can deliver serious pain which can prevent you from doing daily activities and exercise. Plantar fasciitis causes an aching pain that can be localized in the heel, but also radiate throughout the foot. In most cases, pain is most noticeable and serious in the morning when getting out of bed, or after standing up after prolonged sitting. This is because pain in the inflamed area subsides after the plantar fascia relaxes.

Stretch your hamstrings-the muscles on the backs of your thighs-before and after impact activities. According to Sports Injury Bulletin, tight hamstrings lead to overflexion at the knee and cause the foot to flex more in response, increasing impact on the ball of the foot. Stretch your Achilles tendon by standing with your toes on a raised surface and dropping your heel below your toes. Do this with your feet facing forward, inward and outward to stretch in all planes. Stretch your plantar fascia by putting your weight on one leg. Shift your weight to the outside, center and inside of the foot on that leg. Strengthening Exercises.plantar fasciitis exercises

The best way to get rid of your pain is to get your plantar fascia stretched out. When the fascia lengthens it won't pull on your heel and you won't get so much pain. To do this you need to find a Chiropractic Physician or someone with extensive knowledge of the fascia to work on your foot. This procedure is extremely effective but also can be quite painful. It requires the practitioner to push into your fascia with their fingers and manually stretch out your fascia. It normally takes one treatment but may require more.

Plantar fasciitis is a painful inflammatory condition of the foot caused by excessive wear to the plantar fascia that supports the arches of the foot or by biomechanical faults that cause abnormal pronation. 1 The pain usually is felt on the underside of the heel, and is often most intense with the first steps of the day. It is commonly associated with long periods of weight bearing or sudden changes in weight bearing or activity. Obesity, weight gain, jobs that require a lot of walking on hard surfaces, shoes with little or no arch support, and inactivity are also associated with the condition.

The pain associated with plantar fasciitis is typically gradual in onset and is usually located over the inner or medial aspect of the heel. Occasionally, the pain will be sudden in onset, occurring after missing a step or after jumping from a height. The pain is commonly most severe upon arising from bed in the morning, or after periods of inactivity during the day. Thus, it causes what is known as "first-step pain." The degree of discomfort can sometimes lessen with activity during the course of the day or after "warming-up", but can become worse if prolonged or vigorous activity is undertaken.

Treatment of this condition after proper diagnosis from a foot and ankle surgeon usually begins with rest and avoiding any physical activities that might aggravate the plantar fasciitis Icing 20 minutes several times a day also helps reduce the inflammation associated with the condition. Also, it is important to avoid going barefoot. This puts excessive stain on the plantar fascia. Stretching exercises are also critical. Stretching helps not only to stretch the calf muscles but also stretches the plantar fascia to help reduce pain and help with the recovery. Medications are also useful in the treatment process.

There are many treatment options for plantar fasciitis One of the most common treatment is through using the RICE system. This includes rest, ice, compression, elevation. This is used by many athletes and physical therapist to treat a wide variety of symptoms. Plantar fasciitis is no different, in that these techniques can dramatically improve symptoms of plantar fasciitis and reduce a lot of the pain associated with the condition. There other treatment options if this proves to be not enough, such as orthopedic inserts, night splints, and a wide range of products including massage products and rollers. plantar fasciitis shoes

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